Sourcetoad https://www.sourcetoad.com Cross-Platform and Hybrid App Development Wed, 17 Jan 2018 16:28:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 DevFest Florida 2017 https://www.sourcetoad.com/events/devfest-florida-2017/ Fri, 17 Nov 2017 22:06:50 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=12049 We spent last Saturday sponsoring and attending the 2017 edition of DevFest Florida, an annual conference for web and mobile developers and designers organized by the Google Developer Groups of Tampa Bay, Melbourne, and Orlando. The event was held at Disney’s Contemporary Resort, located a monorail ride away from the Magic Kingdom. This year’s conference […]

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We spent last Saturday sponsoring and attending the 2017 edition of DevFest Florida, an annual conference for web and mobile developers and designers organized by the Google Developer Groups of Tampa Bay, Melbourne, and Orlando. The event was held at Disney’s Contemporary Resort, located a monorail ride away from the Magic Kingdom.

This year’s conference featured four tracks, with presentations given by 31 speakers, covering a wide array of topics. The speakers came from a mix of companies, ranging from one-person operations to the likes of Google. Talks from Microsoft, Mozilla, Capital One, Viacom, and Comcast ran the gamut from design to development for web, mobile, and IoT (internet of things). We’ve seen conferences that charged five to ten times as much that didn’t have as good a lineup of presentations.

In addition to sponsoring the event and sending a good number of Sourcetoaders to attend, we also sent two speakers and a lot of our legendary “Code Naked” t-shirts.

In his talk, Attacking Android One Application at a Time, Sourcetoad senior software engineer, Connor Tumbleson, gave the audience a grand tour of the techniques that people use to reverse-engineer Android apps to find out how they work, and more importantly, how weaknesses in their implementation can be exploited.

Android is the world’s most popular mobile ecosystem. With over 2 billion monthly active Android devices in use, the most popular Android apps have large user-bases, which make them tempting targets for third parties to gain unauthorized access to their functionality and data.

Connor conducted a review of some of the most popular free Android apps and ran a number of reverse engineering tools on them. He found that security was often given little or no consideration. He gave the following examples:

  • A popular game, whose ads you’ve probably seen on TV, doesn’t encrypt its communications with its servers, making its messages ripe for interception, and opening the app to man-in-the-middle attacks.
  • Another app used files that appeared to be unreadable to unauthorized parties, until Connor did a little investigative work and found that adding 4 missing bytes to them revealed they were relatively ordinary compressed data.
  • Even when app developers made use of real encryption, they made critical mistakes, like embedding the encryption keys — the information required to unscramble encrypted data — within the app. This is the software equivalent of hiding the key to your house under the front doormat.

Connor isn’t just someone with an interest in reverse engineering. He’s also the maintainer of Apktool, an application that can take finished Android applications (the “apk” in “Apktool” refers to the standard abbreviation for “Android application package”) and convert them into the source code from which they came. It’s like a tool that can generate the blueprints for any house it’s presented with. He knows his way around the structure of Android applications and how unauthorized parties can take advantage of them. We feel that Apktool is a useful contribution to the Android developer ecosystem, and it’s why we sponsor its development.

The presentation was a fascinating, eye-opening look into how software on the computers that we always keep within reach is made, and how easily it can be compromised. It was also a reminder to application designers and developers that security can’t simply be treated as an afterthought or taken lightly.

Our lead product manager Joey deVilla opened with a couple of quick accordion numbers, and then started into his presentation, Native Android development for people who’ve been avoiding it.

Aimed at web developers who’ve been thinking about writing native Android applications but have been avoiding it because they’ve heard it’s difficult and time-consuming, Joey’s presentation was a live-coding exercise where he showed how Android application development has evolved since “the bad old days” of only a couple of years ago:

  • The development environment is better. Instead of using a development environment like Eclipse (which was literally designed by committee, and it shows), Android developers now use the much better-designed, easier-to-use Android Studio. It was created by Jetbrains, who specialize in building tools that developers love.
  • The programming language is better. Instead of Java, which was seen as revolutionary in 1995, but clunky in 2017, we now have Kotlin, a language that borrows from languages like Scala and Groovy, looks a lot like Apple’s popular Swift programming language, lets you write more functionality in fewer lines of code, and is making a splash in the programming world. Like Android Studio, Kotlin was also created by JetBrains.
  • And finally, native mobile development isn’t harder than web development; it’s just a little different. Besides, web development is just as complex these days.

After his presentation, Joey did an interview with Brian Hinton and Fred Weiss from the Gulf Coast-based tech podcast Thunder Nerds, who talked to a number of DevFest Florida speakers.

And finally, if you looked at DevFest Florida’s speaker lineup, you may have noticed something. 13 out of its 31 speakers are women, and of those 13, 8 are women of color. That’s unusual for most conventions, and for a tech conference, that’s downright unheard of. We believe that representation matters, especially in our line of work. A healthy technology ecosystem that produces things all people can use requires this kind of openness, and we’re happy to see DevFest Florida provided a forum and the opportunity for such a diverse group to stand up and be heard. That’s why we were proud to be sponsors.

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Hack Hospitality Cruise Challenge – LocalMotive https://www.sourcetoad.com/cruise/hack-hospitality-cruise-challenge-localmotive/ Fri, 03 Nov 2017 21:18:14 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11993 At the Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon, Mitchell Garcia, Kevin Mircovich, Aaron Wasserman, and Akira Mitchell presented LocalMotive. The app aims to help passengers have a completely local experience when they dock by providing information created by city residents. Watch LocalMotive’s demo from the hackathon to learn more about it.

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At the Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon, Mitchell Garcia, Kevin Mircovich, Aaron Wasserman, and Akira Mitchell presented LocalMotive. The app aims to help passengers have a completely local experience when they dock by providing information created by city residents.

Watch LocalMotive’s demo from the hackathon to learn more about it.

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Hack Hospitality Cruise Challenge – The Iron Yard https://www.sourcetoad.com/cruise/hack-hospitality-cruise-challenge-iron-yard/ Fri, 03 Nov 2017 21:05:43 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11992 One of the teams that chose the Sourcetoad Cruise Challenge at the Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon was The Iron Yard. Toni Warren, Jason Perry, Gavin Stark, and Angel Murchison built an inter-cruise communication system. The app works on a local network and allows you to chat with other members of your group and even locate where […]

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One of the teams that chose the Sourcetoad Cruise Challenge at the Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon was The Iron Yard. Toni Warren, Jason Perry, Gavin Stark, and Angel Murchison built an inter-cruise communication system. The app works on a local network and allows you to chat with other members of your group and even locate where they are on the ship.

Watch the team’s demo from the hackathon to learn more about the project.

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Hack Hospitality Cruise Challenge – BellBoy https://www.sourcetoad.com/cruise/hack-hospitality-cruise-challenge-bellboy/ Wed, 01 Nov 2017 15:47:16 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11977 At the Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon there was only one team that included a robot — BellBoy. Austin Lubetkin, Eric Chan, and Paul Teleweck are working toward a world where you can order a martini in your cabin using an iPad, and in 15 minutes, a robot will arrive at your door with the cocktail. […]

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At the Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon there was only one team that included a robot — BellBoy. Austin Lubetkin, Eric Chan, and Paul Teleweck are working toward a world where you can order a martini in your cabin using an iPad, and in 15 minutes, a robot will arrive at your door with the cocktail.

The BellBoy app is intuitive and easy to use. You type in your cabin number and last name, and a menu pops up. You can then order towels, request delivery of your luggage, order ice, or order from the room-service menu. You can also add toothpaste, shampoo, and other small items. When you have placed your order, a countdown clock begins with your estimated wait time.

BELLBOY

BellBoy in action.

BellBoy is deployed locally using Bluemix, which means passengers can connect to the local network and use it. The robot’s interface is an iPad Mini, so BellBoy can greet other guests as it rolls down the hallway. This also ensures that BellBoy isn’t bumped and your martini doesn’t land up on the floor.

The team’s goal is to eventually have different-sized service robots to accommodate different needs. For example, a smaller version could bring you a bucket of ice, and a larger version could deliver your bag to you.

Austin

Austin Lubetkin presenting at the hackathon.

BellBoy has the potential to shake up the cruise industry, and Austin, Eric, and Paul aren’t stopping with the hackathon. They are currently developing version 2.0, with a focus on creating a BellBoy that can handle the motion of a cruise ship.

To learn more about BellBoy, watch the demo that Austin Lubetkin gave at Sourcetoad’s headquarters.

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Hack Hospitality Cruise Challenge – Team Cheeseburger https://www.sourcetoad.com/cruise/hack-hospitality-cruise-challenge-team-cheeseburger/ Tue, 24 Oct 2017 20:12:29 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11954 The Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon brought together professionals with a variety of experience and talents. Team Cheeseburger (Douglas Radecki, Leon Dorado, Shenole Latimer, Miles Smith, Linggih Saputro, Lisa Pineda, and Veronika Keblinskas) was an example of a well-balanced group of designers and developers. When the team decided to create a booking app, they focused […]

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The Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon brought together professionals with a variety of experience and talents. Team Cheeseburger (Douglas Radecki, Leon Dorado, Shenole Latimer, Miles Smith, Linggih Saputro, Lisa Pineda, and Veronika Keblinskas) was an example of a well-balanced group of designers and developers.

When the team decided to create a booking app, they focused on addressing the following challenges faced by river cruises:

  1. Underutilized resources — When ships dock, most passengers disembark to go sight-seeing. Almost all of the facilities and services on the ship shut down during this period.
  2. Unreliable internet — Providing reliable Wi-Fi is consistently a challenge for cruise ships.
  3. An aging client-base — Bringing on a new generation of passengers is critical for profit and growth.

Team Cheeseburger

Douglas Radecki presenting at the hackathon.

The app’s user persona (fictional ideal customer) is Lisa, a 45 year-old tourist who is traveling with her friend. They’re trying to plan out the next couple of days and begin looking at restaurants on OpenTable.

  • Lisa sees an ad for a dining experience on a docked cruise ship.
  • She taps on the ad and is redirected to a landing page.
  • Here she reads more about the experience and books a lunch for two.
  • After paying, she sees exclusive offers for additional services on the ship.
  • She books post-lunch massages for her and her friend.
  • Lisa then receives an automated phone call confirming her bookings.

The app allows for a younger demographic to be exposed to the cruise line, which potentially creates a new wave of future passengers. The team addressed the challenge of limited Wi-Fi by using SMS to make bookings and updates on the number of positions left.

To learn more about the app, watch the demo that Douglas Radecki, Leon Dorado, and Shenole Latimer gave at Sourcetoad’s headquarters.

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Join Sourcetoad at BarCamp Tampa Bay this Saturday https://www.sourcetoad.com/tampa-tech/join-sourcetoad-at-barcamp-tampa-bay-this-saturday/ Thu, 19 Oct 2017 16:58:13 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11927 This year is the 10th anniversary of BarCamp Tampa Bay, which takes place this Saturday, October 21 at USF Muma College of Business. Sourcetoad is proud to be a “Petabyte Sponsor” of the event. If you’re interested in sharing ideas with other intelligent, passionate, and community-minded people in the Tampa Bay area, you should come to […]

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This year is the 10th anniversary of BarCamp Tampa Bay, which takes place this Saturday, October 21 at USF Muma College of Business. Sourcetoad is proud to be a “Petabyte Sponsor” of the event. If you’re interested in sharing ideas with other intelligent, passionate, and community-minded people in the Tampa Bay area, you should come to this free event!

FOO Camp and Tim O’Reilly (inset). Creative Commons photo by Joi Ito.

In August 2003, Tim O’Reilly — founder of the venerable tech publishing company O’Reilly Media and all-round tech influencer — invited about 200 friends to an event called “FOO Camp,” where “FOO” was short for “Friends Of O’Reilly.” Inspired by the concepts of emergence and self-organization and phenomena like wikis, peer-to-peer software, and the Agile Manifesto, the gathering was a conference where the attendees set the agenda, while the organizer simply provided the opportunity, event space, and food, and drink.

FOO Camp based its format on the Open Space Technology process. It starts with participants sitting in a circle Anyone who has a topic that they want to discuss walks into the middle to write it down, announce it to others in the circle, and pick a time and place for their session. The announced topics, times, and places are written on a central whiteboard, which defines the event’s agenda.

FOO Camp was an invitation-only event, and you had to be on Tim O’Reilly’s radar to even be considered for the guest list. Between the limited number of guest slots and the ultra-high profiles of some of the guests (Google co-founder Larry Page famously arrived at FOO Camp 2007 in a helicopter), an invitation to this event was a rare privilege, even among the “800-pound gorillas” of Silicon Valley, who complained quite loudly when they weren’t invited.

Participants at the first BarCamp. Creative Commons photo by ioerror.

What if there was a FOO Camp that was open to all, not just “A-listers?” That’s a question that a group of San Francisco Bay Area software developers who had no hope of getting on FOO Camp’s guest list asked themselves in August 2005, a week before the third annual FOO Camp took place. They decided to answer their own question, and six days and a lot of quick organizing later, they held the first BarCamp in San Francisco in 2005. Nobody arrived in a helicopter.

The name BarCamp is based on programmer humor. Many classic programming books, notably the Perl ones published by (irony of ironies) O’Reilly, used “foo” and “bar” as the names of variables in their example programs. They’re derived from the World War II slang term “fubar,” which in its polite form is short for “fouled up beyond all recognition.” After “foo” comes “bar,” and therefore the logical successor of FOO Camp is BarCamp.

While there was some friendly rivalry between the exclusive, well-funded FOO Camp and the open-to-all, scrappy BarCamp, the latter was not built on the idea of protesting the former. Instead, it was about building upon FOO Camp’s basic idea and sharing it in a spirit similar to that of open source software. The BarCamp organizers documented their efforts so that it could be duplicated by anyone. Since then, BarCamps have taken place all over the world; Sourcetoad’s Joey deVilla helped organize BarCamp Toronto in 2006, and in 2007 the first BarCamp Tampa Bay was held.

BarCamp isn’t a format for a conference, but an unconference. As an unconference, BarCamp has an agenda that’s created by its attendees instead of its organizers. If you have a topic that you’d like to lead a discussion on, you walk up to the schedule board, write the title of your discussion on a sticky note, and claim a time slot and room. The topics on the schedule board become BarCamp’s agenda.

When BarCamp’s discussions take place, everyone’s encouraged to treat it as a conversation rather than a lecture. If you have a question to ask or an idea to contribute, you don’t have to wait for the Q&A at the end, you can politely add to the discussion as it happens. As BarCampers all over the world like to say, “there are no spectators, only participants.”

You’re also encouraged to follow the “Rule of Two Feet”: use your two feet to take you to discussions where you can contribute, add value, learn, or enjoy. And use them to take you away from ones where you can’t. If someone leaves a discussion at BarCamp, they’re not being rude — they’re simply going to where they can add value and learn, and they’re making room for others to contribute to the session.

While BarCamp was founded by techies and many focus on technology-related topics, anyone can come to a BarCamp and propose a discussion around a topic that’s near and dear to them. There’ve been discussions and even whole BarCamps that have focused on a wide variety of interests such as community-building, public transit, education, healthcare, real estate, banking, and more.

At Sourcetoad, we’re enthusiastic supporters of the Tampa Bay community and the bright, passionate, and involved people that make up the Bay’s technology, social, creative, and civic scenes. That’s why we’re sponsors of BarCamp Tampa Bay, and we’re looking forward for taking part in its tenth anniversary.

If you’re looking for something interesting to do this Saturday, we encourage you to register for BarCamp Tampa Bay (it’s free to attend, and registration helps them plan for food and drink, which they provide for free). Get involved, and participate in the BarCamp phenomenon!

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Hack Hospitality Cruise Challenge – Ryma https://www.sourcetoad.com/cruise/hack-hospitality-cruise-challenge-ryma/ Mon, 09 Oct 2017 20:23:33 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11910 At the recent Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon, one of the teams who chose the Sourcetoad Cruise Challenge was Ryma. Liz Tiller, Michael Nash, Candi Orchulek, Michael Grein, Jasmine Frantz, and Betty Pierce created a luggage tracking system for the cruise industry. The passenger experience is simple and elegant. You check your bag and receive […]

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At the recent Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality hackathon, one of the teams who chose the Sourcetoad Cruise Challenge was Ryma. Liz Tiller, Michael Nash, Candi Orchulek, Michael Grein, Jasmine Frantz, and Betty Pierce created a luggage tracking system for the cruise industry.

The passenger experience is simple and elegant.

  • You check your bag and receive a QR code and URL.
  • When you want to find out the status of your luggage, you visit the URL and scan the code.
  • The status of your luggage appears on your screen (e.g., “In Transit”).

If you want to just wait until you’re notified, you will receive a push notification telling your luggage is ready.

Ryma is also able to be integrated into a cruise line’s current system, which would allow for additional features:

  • You would receive information on shore excursions, spa treatments, restaurant tables, and other ship services, with links to book them.
  • You could view a map to plan out your next port call.

Team Ryma

Michael Nash presenting Ryma at the hackathon.

An important feature of Ryma is that you can access it through your browser. This eliminates the need to download an app on constrained Wi-Fi networks.

Ryma is a React system, powered by Rails, and the team used a Raspberry Pi for the local push notifications.

To learn more about the project, watch the demo that Liz Tiller and Michael Nash presented at Sourcetoad’s headquarters.

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Hack Hospitality Cruise Challenge Winners https://www.sourcetoad.com/cruise/hack-hospitality-cruise-challenge-winners/ Thu, 28 Sep 2017 19:30:13 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11878 The recent Hack Hospitality hackathon presented Tampa Bay developers with problems that hospitality businesses face and challenged them to think up and implement solutions to those problems. This meeting of two very different lines of work — software development and the hospitality industry — was long overdue. The hospitality industry doesn’t always make use of the […]

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The recent Hack Hospitality hackathon presented Tampa Bay developers with problems that hospitality businesses face and challenged them to think up and implement solutions to those problems.

This meeting of two very different lines of work — software development and the hospitality industry — was long overdue. The hospitality industry doesn’t always make use of the latest technology, and the technology they use typically comes from various vendors and often doesn’t integrate well. Hack Hospitality aimed to bring the two groups together to create practical, useful, and usable software solutions.

Sourcetoad sponsored the Cruise Challenge, where participants were encouraged to come up with innovative solutions to issues faced by the cruise industry.

The Explori.us team. From left to right: Alex Spencer, Keri Spencer, Taylor Cox, Mandy Jacobson, Rob Venables

A number of the teams took on our challenge, and one of them produced the grand prize winner: Explori.us, an application that helps cruise passengers find the shore excursions that are best suited for them.

What makes Explori.us special is the way in which it accomplishes its goal. Rather than pepper users with a series of questions in order to determine their likes and dislikes to ultimately match them with excursions, Explori.us uses a clever combination of various artificial intelligence-powered “software as a service” services to find the appropriate excursions for a given person, using only that person’s Facebook profile. As a startup application idea, Explori.us is ambitious. As a hackathon project that’s meant to be built in a weekend, it’s downright audacious. That’s why we love it.

To use Explori.us, you would log in using your Facebook account. From Facebook, Explori.us uses your email address, gender, and most importantly, your profile photo as a starting point to determine which excursions would be the best fit.

Let’s suppose you’ve logged into Explori.us and this is your Facebook profile photo:

People usually choose a photo that they feel best represents themselves and their interests. That’s why it’s a great starting point to get information about someone. Explori.us runs the user’s profile photo through Google’s Cloud Vision service to identify objects in the photo, which it uses to produce a list of topics. For the example photo above, these are only a few of the topics that it identified:

  1. Mountains
  2. Water
  3. Hiking boots
  4. Trees

From those four topics, we humans can easily infer that the person in the profile photo probably likes nature and “outdoorsy” activities. Explori.us approximates our ability to make this kind of inference by feeding the identified items into IBM’s Natural Language Classifier service to determine what conceptual categories they fall under.

At the same time, Explori.us takes the email address associated with the Facebook account and feeds it to the FullContact service. Given an email address, FullContact responds by sending back all textual biographical information on the person connected to that email address. Just as it did with the terms extracted from the user’s Facebook profile photo, Explori.us runs the social media data that FullContact provides through IBM’s Natural Language Classifier service to get even more conceptual categories.

Just as the large amount of textual information derived from the user’s photo and social media accounts is turned into a set of a few hundred conceptual categories, those categories are further reduced to a smaller set of category markers.

At this point we’re now dealing with a pared-down set of input data. This paring down is known as dimension reduction, and it’s an important part of machine learning. The more dimensions — or, more simply, the more inputs — that a machine learning or data mining algorithm has to consider, the less accurate its predictions tend to be.

For our example profile photo, Explori.us’ systems took the identified items, placed them into categories, and then derived the following category markers:

  1. Sports: Climbing
  2. Sports: Canoeing and Kayaking
  3. Hiking Boots
  4. Trees

Once the category markers are derived, they’re mapped to statistical models, each one corresponding to a different variable that describes some aspect of an excursion:

  1. Activity level
  2. Preferred category
  3. Preferred price
  4. Duration

These models are used to create a request that’s fed into Amazon’s machine learning service to perform multinomial logistic regression, a statistical analysis method that tries to connect a choice or the outcome of an event with a number of independent factors that contribute to that choice or outcome. Examples of multinomial logistic regression include:

  • Determining the next major repair a car will need, given its make and model, age, mileage, current condition, the climate in which it’s operated, and maintenance history.
  • Predicting which candidate a voter will choose, going by the voter’s income, level of education, occupation, and where the voter lives.

In this particular case, multinomial logistic regression is being used to determine which excursions will be the best match for the user, based on the excursion variables listed above.

As impressive as Explori.us’ machine learning software is, it’s only part of the solution. That software also needs to be “trained” by feeding it lots of data, which requires actual human input.

Since there wasn’t any data on passenger excursion preferences, the team had to find a way to seek it out. They created a survey that asked people to provide the following information:

  • Their Facebook public profile page
  • The level of activity they’d prefer on an excursion
  • The types of excursions that they’d prefer
  • What they’d want to pay for such an excursion
  • How long their ideal excursion would be

The answers to the survey would be used as sample data to train the machine learning system to match people to excursions. Explori.us would learn to match people’s social media artifacts — their photos, posts, and bios — with the variables describing their ideal excursion, and use this data as examples to predict which excursions people would prefer based on their Facebook media profile.

To find people to complete the survey, the team employed Amazon’s Mechnical Turk “marketplace for work” service, offering a small (30 – 50 cents) reward for completing it.

At the end of their presentation, they asked if we had any questions. Our CEO Greg Ross-Munro summarized our amazement at their work with his first question: “You built this in two days?!

To the Explori.us team…

  • Taylor Cox
  • Mandy Jacobson
  • Alex Spencer
  • Keri Spencer
  • Rob Venables

…we’d like to congratulate you on a job well done and on winning the Hack Hospitality grand prize! The ingenuity, complexity, and potential usefulness of your solution to a cruise industry problem exemplifies not only the sort of solution we were hoping to see as a result of the hackathon, but also the sort of Tampa Bay technology talent that we wanted the hackathon to highlight. Nicely done!

To learn more about the project, watch the demo the Explori.us team gave at Sourcetoad’s headquarters.

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Hack Hospitality Interview Sourcetoad’s Joey deVilla https://www.sourcetoad.com/events/hack-hospitality-interview-sourcetoads-joey-devilla/ Wed, 06 Sep 2017 20:47:47 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11854 Over the next few weeks, we’ll be diving deeper into our cruise challenge. In the mean time, here’s an interview with Joey during Hack Hospitality.

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Over the next few weeks, we’ll be diving deeper into our cruise challenge. In the mean time, here’s an interview with Joey during Hack Hospitality.

Interview with Sourcetoad's Joey deVilla at Hack Hospitality 2017

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Hack Hospitality Hackathon https://www.sourcetoad.com/cruise/hack-hospitality-hackathon/ Mon, 28 Aug 2017 21:07:22 +0000 https://www.sourcetoad.com/?p=11835 Congratulations to Mandy Jacobson, Keri Spencer, Taylor Cox, Rob Venables, and Alex Spencer for winning the Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality $3,000 prize. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be reviewing all the cruise challenge solutions in more depth. Thank you to everyone involved. It was an exceptional event, and if you didn’t make it, you […]

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Congratulations to Mandy Jacobson, Keri Spencer, Taylor Cox, Rob Venables, and Alex Spencer for winning the Tampa Bay Hack Hospitality $3,000 prize. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be reviewing all the cruise challenge solutions in more depth.

Thank you to everyone involved. It was an exceptional event, and if you didn’t make it, you can watch all the pitches on Tampa Bay Hackathon’s Facebook page.

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